All About the New Drug to Quit Smoking

Smoking tobacco is a deadly habit which claims millions of lives every year. The majority of the world’s population, however, are still grappling with this addiction. Tobacco contains a powerful, addictive drug – nicotine and smokers find it hard if not impossible to give up this habit.

If you are a cigarette smoker and you are serious to quit smoking for a better tomorrow, then you can try taking Cytisine which has been tested to be very effective. It’s vital to stop smoking as it can cause severe health complications such as mouth cancer, lung cancer, throat cancer, stroke, infertility and high blood pressure.

What may be more dangerous is the effect of smoking on those who are exposed to it. That exposure can be hazardous, especially to those closest to you. In fact, most of the smoke from a cigarette escapes into the air where it can be inhaled by any non-smoker unlucky enough to be seated or standing next to you. Thus, giving up smoking will prove to be a prudent decision for yourself and others around you. You also save a lot of money on buying tons of cigarettes every day. Considering all the health dangers associated with smoking, you must try to quit smoking right away.

Cytisine is a medicine that has been used to treat nicotine addiction in Europe for many years. The drug is an alkaloid contained in Cytisus Laburnum (Golden rain acacia), especially in its seeds. Cytisine is said to perform the same role as nicotine. It has the ability to stimulate the brain’s receptors that are also stimulated by nicotine, and has been used as a substitute for tobacco for almost half a century.

Cytisine is marketed by Tabex – a Bulgarian pharmaceutical company. Currently, the recommended prescription of the drug is one tablet for every two hours. One should take a total of six tablets per day. The standard duration for this treatment is 25 days. The drug cytisine has been proven to be more effective than a placebo. Researchers claim that its low cost has made it a preferred alternative to other stop-smoking drugs. This means it could be an advantage to developing countries since it is reasonably priced.

Side effects of taking Cytisine

Several studies have shown that cytisine, sold as Tabex, has some side effects, as well. These effects include dry mouth, stomach ache, nausea, heartburn and difficulty in breathing. These conditions, however, are generally trivial and temporary.

Conclusion

If there is a stop-smoking medication that is affordable, effective and safe, then it would be Tabex. This medication is safe for everyone except those under the age of 18 years. However, you should take the drug only as recommended by a physician. You can purchase Cytisine Tabex online through any of the registered medical stores after consulting a physician and getting it prescribed. The doctor will confirm the safety of the drug for your body as excessive dosage can hamper breathing and cause death. Nevertheless, correct use of this anti-smoking medication may increase your chances of quitting cigarettes significantly.

Generic Drugs and Online Pharmacies

Even someone who has been living under a rock for the last five or so years would be aware of the confusion, misconception and questions that exist regarding generic prescription drugs, especially the largest selling online, by far, Viagra (Sildenafil Citrate) and other drugs used for the treatment of erectile dysfunction.

Some people believe much of the misinformation published by those who would have them pay ten times more for genuine drugs rather than the far cheaper generic versions. Much of the confusion and misconception exists because, understandably, many can’t see how the generic drug can be the same thing but be so cheap. Well, here is why the vast difference exists. It’s no secret, nor is it difficult to understand. It’s simply economics versus opportunism (although sometimes justified).

The following applies to all generic drugs sold through online pharmacies and in retail pharmacies on the street. There is no difference.

When the drug is first researched, discovered and developed, it takes a number of years and many, many millions (if not billions) of dollars in research, failure, more research, testing through multiple stages. Then come the trials, which have to satisfy the likes of the FDA (most countries have their own version of the FDA), which can, again, take years and more millions and even still fail for one reason or another.

Once the drug is approved by the authorities as safe (or relatively so, with the appropriate warnings…), the drug company then have to spend more millions and months marketing and promoting it to the public and the medical profession and wait for them to become confident in the product. Then comes the mass manufacture, packaging, wholesaling, and distribution etc of the tablets or whatever form the drug tales.

Interestingly, for instance, from the time the patent was taken out on Viagra in 1993 it took five years, till 1998, before it could be sold. Huge investments in money, time and resources, which the drug company (and shareholders) needed desperately to recover, hopefully in short order. Who can blame them, really? It’s a huge investment and huge risk with any new drug and some don’t end up being worthwhile.

That’s why any original drug is relatively expensive compared to it’s generic counterpart. At least for the first decade or so, while these enormous investments are being recovered. Very simple indeed.

Now for generic drugs, of which there are many. First of all, they are generally manufactured overseas because of cheaper labor and production costs and also because the patent doesn’t allow for them to be made or sold in the U.S. (if that’s where they were originally discovered and patented) except by the patent owner. They can however, be imported, in personal quantities by individuals, in most countries.

Before we go any further, as I said, many other countries have their own versions of the FDA, which are every bit as stringent and effective. Those countries that don’t have such an authority rely on the World Health Organization (W.H.O.) to approve and monitor the manufacture of already proven pharmaceuticals. Let’s face it, when people get sick in Australia, Britain, India, Russia, China, Japan etc and take the drugs made in their own country, they get better. The U.S is NOT the only place in the world that can be trusted to make quality, safe and effective pharmaceuticals. It would be silly and cynical to think so.

In fact, it may surprise some that the bulk ingredients for some so-called ‘US manufactured’ drugs are actually imported from other countries, so let’s be realistic!

The Generic drug that is purchased online is GENERALLY made in pharmaceutical facilities, which are approved by authorities much the same as the FDA and/or W.H.O. It is also interesting to note that vast amounts of GENERIC drugs like antibiotics, immunizations, birth control pills and even Viagra are used by the likes of W.H.O., World Vision and the Red Cross etc in their humanitarian endeavors because of their vastly cheaper prices. If they’re good enough for The Red Cross, are they good enough for you? I think so…

Generic Drugs that are sold through Online Pharmacies are so cheap because of the cheaper labor in other countries, but more so because of the obvious following reasons:

NO huge initial investment to recover.

NO wholesalers, distributors or retailers, they are shipped to the client from the manufacturer.

NO transport costs between three, four or often five of the above organizations.

NO stock needs to be kept by any of these non-existent middlemen or Pharmacies.

NO ‘bricks and mortar’ premises need to be maintained by the middlemen or the Pharmacies.

So you see, the ongoing mark-ups or profits from each of these middlemen don’t exist because they don’t exist, just the price from the manufacturer and their commission to the referring Online Pharmacy.

In closing, I must admit that there ARE counterfeit drugs and there are drugs, which don’t contain much of the effective ingredient. This problem is seen more so in drugs like Viagra, cialis and Levitra (the ED drugs) because of their popularity but STILL, these account for a very small percentage indeed, of the quality generic drugs sold online. People are still buying online drugs in droves and they wouldn’t continue to do that if they were having bad or questionable experiences, would they?

It’s also been discovered that the counterfeit drugs that everyone seems to condemn online Pharmacies over, ALSO show up in ‘bricks and mortar’ Pharmacies. So, why aren’t people wary of these retail outlets? Easy… media and the original manufacturer’s hype. Of course they’d rather sell all the online buyers genuine drugs at a much higher rate.

As for the best way to tell a safe online Pharmacy, look for a toll free phone number and other means of contact, for following up orders, requesting cancellations, refunds or complaints. If they have these, they can hardly be surviving by selling inferior products. Check out the contacts first if you wish to make sure they’re genuine.

This article is written in the spirit of assisting those who have a need for prescription drugs but are unable to, or have difficulty in, financing their urgent needs. Generic drugs are safe, in the main and online pharmacies are honest and helpful, also in the main. Action is continually being taken against pharmacies (both online and on the street), which sell inferior products. Hopefully we will soon have worldwide pharmacy access, which all people can trust and take advantage of.

New Drug Offers Hope to Sufferers of Premature Ejaculation

According to statistics published in the Journal of the Medical Association in 1999, around 30 percent of men consider that they ejaculate too quickly during sex. If this is indeed the case, premature ejaculation is by far the most prevalent male sexual dysfunction. Of course, this can be a pretty subjective issue – what might seem like a sprint to one man may seem like a marathon to the next.

Most sex therapists agree however, that the ‘normal’ time frame between penetration and ejaculation is between two and ten minutes. In fact, an official definition of premature ejaculation published in the Journal of Sexual Medicine in 2008 states that sufferers usually climax within a minute or so of penetration and that the condition causes significant anxiety and concern.

If you are one of these men, you may be interested to know that a new medication has just hit the market. The drug, branded Priligy (known by the pharmaceutical name Dapoxetine) is the first drug of its kind to be specifically developed and licensed for the treatment of premature ejaculation. Presently, Priligy has been granted licenses in a number of EU countries including Germany, Sweden, and Italy; and most recently in the UK. At the time of writing, the drug is still awaiting approval by the FDA for marketing in the US – although it can be purchased online.

Priligy only has to be taken when needed, 1-3 hours before sex, and according to clinical trials can increase the length of sex by up to three times.

In a preliminary study published in the international medical journal The Lancet in 2006 for example, the effectiveness and safety of Priligy was examined in a 12 week trial involving over 2600 sufferers of premature ejaculation. Those given a placebo showed little improvement in ejaculatory control; whilst those given the new treatment increased the time they took to ejaculate from an average of 0.91 minutes to 3.32 minutes. In fact, five clinical trials testing the effectiveness of Priligy on over 6000 men in total in the last few years have all shown similar results.

Priligy is specifically designed to be taken as and when required, as opposed to every day. According to research published in the urology journal BJU International in 2008, the drug is both fast acting and is then quickly eliminated from the body within 24 hours – therefore preventing any potential build up of toxicity in the body. Reported side effects of the drug are relatively mild but include nausea (8.7% of men), headache (5.9%) and dizziness (3%). However, given the short acting nature of Priligy, these potential adverse side effects are short lived.

Rise in Popularity of Online Pharmacies Has Serious Consequences

The unregulated sale of controlled drugs through online pharmacies is a growing trend in the United States. In a society heavily influenced by the sultry lure of the prescription medications that are currently used to treat a variety of biological and behavioral problems, it comes as no surprise that eventually many of our medical needs would be met by online pharmaceutical retailers. There are many benefits to this type of drug distribution. The disabled or homebound population can have their medications conveniently delivered to their homes, shoppers enjoy a certain level of discretion and anonymity, and the selection of products is vast. Item information can be easily researched and compared through the use of websites, and computers can quickly catch potentially dangerous prescription errors. However, despite the seeming benefits of this online trade, there are many significant drawbacks also associated with the sale of online prescription drugs.

In a study released last Wednesday July 9th, by the National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse at Columbia University, under the leadership of Joseph Califano, it was found that most websites selling prescription opioids, stimulants, and depressants require no legitimate prescription to do so. This rise in illegitimate drug activity has also been linked to the growing abuse of prescription drugs especially amongst college students. This year alone there are 365 sites devoted to selling controlled medications by mail. Controlled drugs commonly purchased without a prescription included Oxycontin, methadone, Vicodin, Xanax, and Valium.

According to a 2005 study completed by Christopher Littlejohn and his associates, online merchants can be categorized into four basic types–“legitimate,” “subscription,” “lifestyle” and “no-prescription.” Legitimate pharmacies operate similarly to traditional pharmacies. Customers must have a prescription from a licensed medical practitioner, and in general these websites do not offer the types of controlled prescription drugs that are most commonly obtained illegally and abused. Users of subscription pharmacies are granted access to a full range of drugs without a prescription once they sign up for a program and pay a membership fee. These subscription websites are furtively maintained in hard-to-regulate areas of the world like Mexico and Asia. Lifestyle pharmacies ask customers to fill out a medical questionnaire in lieu of a prescription. They commonly provide more elective or luxury drugs that treat conditions such as alopecia, obesity, and impotence. No-Prescription pharmacies are just that. These are sites that are willing to mail controlled drugs to online customers without a prescription. Littlejohn’s study also contended that the people who most commonly ordered drugs illegally from these websites were literate, credit card owning individuals with internet access. These three factors also lead to the inference that the abusers of online pharmacies are of a relatively high socioeconomic status.

There are many distressing consequences associated with the sale of prescription drugs online. Unlike conventional pharmacies, there is little to no consumer protection over the internet. Products can be advertised with false claims and the sale of unapproved trial drugs goes unchecked. The administrators of illegal websites often remain anonymous and can quickly disable and create new sites that make it difficult for any regulatory agency to keep track of their activities. Operations are also commonly run outside of the U.S. making law enforcement officials scramble to put together international cooperation efforts.

This lack of effective online pharmacy regulation can lead to disastrous consequences. Francine Haight of La Mesa, Calif lost her son Ryan to an overdose of the generic form of Vicodin, which he ordered without her permission online with a debit card. “The Internet made it easy for the drug dealers to sneak into your living room,” she said. The sale of online drugs has lead to drug and substance abuse, and death related to drug interactions, incorrect dosage or administration, and impure drugs. Illegal prescriptions can end up in the hands of children or others who are incapable of using them responsibly.

As the sale of controlled drugs without a prescription is a recent phenomenon, means of combating the trend are still in development. The FDA has vowed to increase public outreach and awareness, expand enforcement, and develop tighter bonds of international cooperation. In April the “Ryan Haight Online Pharmacy Consumer Protection Act” was approved by the Senate and is currently being reviewed in House committee meetings. If passed, the legislation would require online pharmacies to be properly certified and for doctors to meet in person with patients before giving out a prescription for a controlled drug. Some state governments have already passed laws that regulate the online drug trade but many advocates are pushing for stricter federal regulation. Some search engine companies have begun to fight back against online sellers by employing a program called, “Pharmacy Checker.” The device filters out unlawful advertisers and forces them to provide verification.

The sale of controlled drugs over the internet is proliferating quickly and as is commonly seen with progress in technology, there is a gap between action and regulation. According to the Drug Enforcement Agency, 85% of internet drugs sales are controlled drugs while only 11% of those same drugs are being sold at traditional pharmacies. These statistics display the obvious potential for drug abuse and need for greater online pharmaceutical quality control. In a society where prescription drugs have become the norm rather than psychotherapy, counseling, or cognitive behavioral therapy, this online market flourishes.

Sources:

Eckholm, Eirk. (2008, July 9). Abuses Found in Online Sales of Medication. New York Times, Retrieved July 10th, 2008, from nytimes.com/2008/07/09/health/09drugs.html?_r=1&oref=slogin

Henney, Jane. (2001). Cyberpharmacies and the role of the US Food and Drug Administration. Journal of Medical Internet Research, 3(1), Retrieved July 10, 2008 from the PubMed database.

Littlejohn,C., Baldacchino, A., Schifano, F., & Deluca, P. (2005). Internet Pharmacies And Online Prescription Drug Sales: a cross-sectional study. Drugs: education prevention and policy, 12, 75-80. Retrieved July 10th 2008, from the Academic Search Premier database.